Week of Soup: Sassy Salsa

January 15, 2008 at 10:30 am 6 comments

Salsa Verde Soup 

In my quest to find some distinctive soup recipes for SFTF’s Week of Soup, I flipped through just about all my cookbooks.  I got a good workout lifting them up and down from the high shelf in my kitchen that they call home.  I have big books, little books, soft cover books, hard backed books, spiral bound and saddle-stitched, all-text types, pictures- on-every-page types, black and white graphics, vivid color graphics, thick books and thin books… In short, while I might not have every cookbook in the world (an achievement I have to admit contemplating tackling on occasion), I do have quite the variety of them.

As I’ve talked about before though, A Good Day for Soup seems to stand above the others, at least when I’m looking for portage inspiration of course.  To look at it, you might not be quick to pick this book up at the store.  It’s paperback and not terribly pretty.   By that I mean, the cover is nice and graphic but not scrumptious as so many cookbooks’ are.  The recipes are copious but there’s nary a picture to be seen, something that’s almost guaranteed to have me putting a cookbook back on the store’s shelf instead of the cashier’s counter.  But, for whatever reason, I did buy this picture-less book, and I’ve always been glad I did.  The recipes are written with such passion and interest that I just know, deep down in my soup-making bones, the authors are kindred spirits of mine.  

Thawed out salsa verde from the freezer

Having thumbed through its pages many a time before, I was surprised to see a recipe I hadn’t noticed before this time – a chilled soup made from tomatillos.  This recipe was perfect…if it were August!  But in January I’d be hard pressed to 1) find local tomatillos and 2) work up the will to eat cold soup.  Rarely daunted by such problematic points, I thought to myself that I might have luck adapting this recipe to use up some of my frozen stores of salsa verde…hmmmm…  You see, the farm had absolute GOBS of tomatillos this summer, and I had no choice but to make GOBS of salsa verde to freeze.  I have since regretted this non-choice on the occasions when my big toe has gotten an unhappy reception when I open the freezer door and a container falls out.  Too much frozen salsa verde can indeed be a bad thing. 

Good opportunity to use some the farm's oregano I had dried

So really, I had nothing to loose.  As for the temperature thing, I figured if a soup can be cooked, why can’t it be eaten warm?  Indeed!  For the sake of experiment, I tried it both ways, and I really did prefer it warm.  In fact, I was pleased as punch with its flavor overall.   If you don’t have your own frozen stash of salsa verde on hand at the moment, this soup is still feasible using a jar of salsa verde from the grocery store.  Just give the stuff you buy a taste prior to putting it in the soup.  If it’s got a lot of hot pepper heat to it already, cut back on the minced jalapeno called for in the salsa topping.  I had made my frozen salsa verde relatively mild so that it might prove more adaptable for just such occasions as this when I’m trying out a new recipe. 

When tomatillo season rolls around again, I’m going to revisit this recipe using fresh tomatillos to see if I still prefer to eat the soup warm.  I’m sure my preference will be swayed by the 90 degree weather much the same as it was swayed by the 40 degree weather this time.   At the end of the day, no matter what season that day is in, this sassy little soup is just the thing to spice it up.

Fresh tomatillo at Weavers Way Farm

SALSA VERDE SOUP
Loosely adapted from A Good Day for Soup

Soup
2 c. salsa verde*
1/2 c. canned diced tomatoes
2 c. vegetable stock
1 T. sugar
1/2 t. dried oregano
2 t. frozen cilantro or 2 T. fresh chopped
1/2 c. creme fraiche or heavy cream
salt and pepper

Salsa Topping
1/2 c. canned diced tomatoes
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1 small jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely minced
1 T. lime juice
2 T. extra virgin olive oil
salt and pepper

In a medium saucepan, combine the salsa verde, tomatoes, stock, sugar, oregano, and cilantro.  Cook 10 minutes.  Use a blender to puree until smooth.  If desired, pass through a strainer to remove any seeds (I did not).  Let cool slightly and stir in creme fraiche.  Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Meanwhile, combine the salsa topping ingredient is a medium bowl. Ladle soup into bowls and swirl a large spoonful of salsa on top.  Good served warm or chilled.

(serve 4-6)

Lime and diced tomatoes for the salsa topping

Entry filed under: Recipes, Soup. Tags: , , , , .

Week of Soup: Peanuts with a Bite Week of Soup: Sweet Heat

6 Comments Add your own

  • […] up a recipe for peanut soup that I find absolutely delicious-sounding, as well as recipe for chilled tomatillo soup that was a great way to use up some of the salsa verde that she made and froze after the summer […]

    Reply
  • 2. urbanfeed  |  January 16, 2008 at 12:31 pm

    I can so relate to the freezer problem. In our house, it’s usually frozen one-pound boxes of butter falling on our feet. What a clever use of leftovers!

    Reply
  • 3. Jennie  |  January 16, 2008 at 12:41 pm

    You’re so right, Urbanfeed! I can’t wait for the day that I have a large enough house/basement to have a seperate freezer to solve all my frozen falling objects problem! BTW, I love your blog! It’s the meat-eaters counterpart to mine. 🙂

    Reply
  • […] up a recipe for peanut soup that I find absolutely delicious-sounding, as well as recipe for chilled tomatillo soup that was a great way to use up some of the salsa verde that she made and froze after the summer […]

    Reply
  • 5. Week of Soup: Zesty Zinger « Straight from the Farm  |  January 17, 2008 at 10:30 am

    […] I was going to rave about A Good Day for Soup.  PBeen there.  […]

    Reply
  • 6. "artikel"  |  October 12, 2013 at 4:25 pm

    “artikel”

    “[…]q What an excellent description! No idea how you were able to say this text.. k4[…]”

    Reply

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