Week 2 of Bread: ‘Sin’namon

February 5, 2008 at 10:14 am 14 comments

Cinnamon Rolls 

It’s a big day on the calendar, my friends.  It’s Super Tuesday here in the States, which means a lot of us will be trotting to the polls to decide which presidential wannabe is less evil than the rest.  It’s the start of Mardi Grai or Carnival in several countries, which means there’s lots of dancing to be had and occasional stripping for beads.  It’s World Nutella Day, which if you haven’t had the pleasure of eating nutella before, you really should rectify that today.   It’s also Día de la Constitución in Mexico, which is an official holiday to celebrate the signing of their current Constitution.

Golden raisins

But most importantly, it’s Fat Tuesday here in Pennsylvania, which means any god-fearing life-long resident with a German heritage is making a batch of oh-so-bad-for-you-but-unnervingly-delicious fried fauschnauts (the counterpart to pancakes and doughnuts in other parts of the world that observe “Shrove” Tuesday).   When I was growing up in the rural heart of Pennsylvania, my school actually celebrated Fauschnaut Day by serving homemade fauschnauts at lunch.  To this day I am baffled by how a cafeteria renowned for its inedible cuisine was able to churn out these little balls of heaven once a year.   My mom also made homemade fauschnauts during much of my childhood, and I adored swiping them straight out of the cinnamon sugar mixture while they were still piping hot.  Ah, the memories…

Raw cinnamon rolls

I hang my head in shame to admit that I forgot all about fauschnauts until today.  You see, they would have been PEFRECT for this current theme of bread variations.  Fried dough most definitely classifies as bread in my book.  You can even make them with just a few adjustments to the Miracle Bread recipe I already provided.   Yes, yes, there’s still time to make the fauschnauts today, but not time to post them (this thing called a “job” does tend to hinder my culinary ambitions like that). 

Cinnamon!!!

I guess we’ll all have to settle for some cinnamon rolls/buns instead.  It’s just despicable, isn’t it?  I can’t believe this sweet, gooey, lick-your-fingers-afterwards recipe is all I have to offer you on Fat Tuesday.  To make up for it, I’ll throw in a second recipe for cinnamon raisin bread.  Surely that will even up my debt to my Pennsylvania-Dutch heritage, won’t it? 

Homemade Cinnamon Roll

Of course this redemption isn’t enough to cover up the sin of not posting a nutella recipe today, as any good food blogger worth her salt would be doing.  Okay, okay, here’s my solution.  Make the cinnamon rolls as directed in the recipe, but just after spreading the dough with butter and before blanketing it with cinnamon and sugar, slap on a layer of nutella for an even more decadent dessert or breakfast treat. 

Cinnamon Raisin Bread

Whew, I think I’m just about absolved of my (food-related) sins.  Can I just go home now before I get myself in any more trouble?  All I really want to do is make some fauschnauts…

Cutting the cinnamon roll dough into slices

CINNAMON RAISIN BREAD & CINNAMON ROLLS
An adaptation of the Miracle Bread recipe

Part I
2 c. boiling water
2 T. butter
2 T. sugar
2 t. salt

Combine above ingredients and cool to lukewarm.

Part II
1/2 c. hot (but not boiling) water
2 packages of rapid rise dry yeast (2T.)
1 T. (scant) sugar

Whisk together Part II ingredients in a medium bowl and cover with a towel.  Let yeast rise for 15-20 minutes, being sure it froths up and expands considerably.  If yeast doesn’t rise, toss it and get new yeast before proceeding.   Once yeast has risen, combine with Part I. 

now that's some happy yeast!

Part III
1 1/2 c. whole-wheat flour
5 c. white bread flour
1+ c. golden raisins
1+ c. brown sugar
5-6 T. cinnamon
4 T. soft butter
1 c. confectioners’ sugar
3 T. warm water

**You can most certainly just make one kind or the other of the two variations outlined below.  Or, conversely, you could just cut the ingredients in Part I & II in half and use only half the flour to just make one loaf of bread or a dozen rolls.  In my opinion though, making a full batch of dough and turning it into both these goodies is the best and easiest game plan.**

Add flour to liquid mixture from Parts I and II.  Mix with a spoon at first and then using your hands as it comes together.  Add just enough flour to keep dough from being sticky.  Knead dough for a few times and then cover bowl with a towel to let it rise.  Come back to it every 10 minutes or so to punch it down and knead it some more, repeating this process 4-5 times.   Don’t worry if you leave it longer – just be sure to punch it down a few times before proceeding with baking.

Divide dough in half and set one half to the side.  Roll out dough in a rectangle to about a quarter inch thickness.  Sprinkle dough generously and evenly with cinnamon and raisins.  Press down on the raisins with your hands to flatten against the dough.  Starting from a short end, roll up the dough into a tight jellyroll loaf.  Pinch edges of dough together and place in a large greased loaf pan.  Cover with a dishtowel and allow to rise for 30 minutes or until doubled in bulk.

Raisin bread before it's rolled up

Returning to the other half of dough that had been set aside, knead it for a minute and then roll it out into a rectangle to about a quarter inch thickness.  First spread the soft butter evenly over the dough and then sprinkle generously with the brown sugar and cinnamon.  Starting from the short end, roll up dough into a tight jellyroll.  Using a serrated knife, cut the dough roll into 12 even slices (I like to start by cutting it in half and then cutting the halves into halves and so forth).  Slices will be about an inch thick   Place slices flat in a greased 11” x 7” baking pan, evenly spacing them out so they have room to rise.  Cover pan with a dishtowel and allow to rise for 30 minutes. 

Preheat oven to 375 F and bake risen loaf and rolls for 20 minutes or until browned on top and hollow when tapped.   Take loaf and rolls from the oven and brush with melted butter.   Mix the cup of confectioners’ sugar with the 3 tablespoons of water to form a thin glaze.  Using a spoon, drizzle the glaze over the cinnamon rolls while still warm.  If desired, you can also glaze the raisin loaf, but wait until it is cool. 

(makes 1 loaf and 12 cinnamon rolls)

Cinnamon Raisin Bread looks soo good.

Entry filed under: Bread, Recipes. Tags: , , , , , , .

Week 2 of Bread: Sourdough Week 2 of Bread: Cheddar Pepper

14 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Tim Ramsey  |  February 5, 2008 at 10:25 am

    I found your site on technorati and read a few of your other posts. Keep up the good work. I just added your RSS feed to my Google News Reader. Looking forward to reading more from you.

    Tim Ramsey

    Reply
  • 2. realworldmartha  |  February 5, 2008 at 11:37 am

    Ok, that’s just wrong! I want some! YUMMY! That looks fabulous!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • 3. gintoino  |  February 5, 2008 at 5:54 pm

    I’m not much of a sweet eating person (if you don’t count chocolate and all the chocolate derived products, recipes, deserts) but those look great. I might be tempted to try the cinnamon raisin bread😉
    By the way, I just baked my first successful sourdough bread! All thanx to you! I discovered what I was doing wrong and by using the temperatures you advised it came out perfect! I’m really happy (childish happy)

    “trotting to the polls to decide which presidential wannabe is less evil than the rest” LOL

    Reply
  • 4. Jennie  |  February 5, 2008 at 7:26 pm

    Thanks Tim and Realworldmartha!! 🙂 If I could ship them out over cyberspace, I would…

    Reply
  • 5. Jennie  |  February 5, 2008 at 7:46 pm

    Gintoino – Excellent news about the sourdough success! I’m very pleased to have created some childish happiness in your day!! 🙂 Glad my pointers were helpful! As for today’s post, it’s worth the try, considering the incredible success rate you’re having with bread these days. Put some nutella in there and it’ll help satisfy the chocolate criteria. 😉

    As always, I’m so glad somebody (you!) gets my twisted sense of humor…thank you for indulging me! 🙂

    Reply
  • 6. Julia  |  February 6, 2008 at 10:20 am

    wowow i want to eat these. my question is, how do you have the time to do so much baking?? i would love to make these cinnamon rolls this weekend, i just hope i can find enough time for it.

    Reply
  • 7. Jennie  |  February 6, 2008 at 11:49 am

    Thanks, Julia! 🙂 I could write an entire post about how I find the time to do so much baking… in fact, that’s a good idea! The short answer is that I plan ahead and that bread baking isn’t all that time consuming once you get the hang of it. The long answer (which I think I really will talk about in a future post so thanks for the inspiration) has a lot to do with a philosophical-nearing-spirital commitment to create a “space” in my life for baking, which is an activity I love because it is creative and I get to work with my hands to produce something that’s nourishing to my physical body too. In other words, please make these cinnamon rolls this weekend, being sure to clear a mental space to enjoy the process instead of just rushing through it to get to the next “to do” item. That might be the best way to find the answer to your question. 🙂 Happy baking!!

    Reply
  • 8. mangopowergirl  |  February 9, 2008 at 6:33 pm

    yum! i’ve been wanting to make for my husband, who loves them…and i love how yours are whole wheat….i am so making them!

    Reply
  • 9. Jennie  |  February 10, 2008 at 5:52 pm

    Thanks, Mango Power Girl! Lemme know how they turn out for you! 🙂

    Reply
  • 10. jackie  |  February 12, 2008 at 9:39 pm

    I had been craving cinnamon raisin bread but the cinnamon rolls looked too yummy to resist. For some reason, I had some trouble rolling out the dough flat enough before making the “jelly roll,” and ended up with thicker (but fewer) buns. The dough had doubled in volume but it was quite springy when rolled even though I had let it rest for a few minutes first. They still tasted great though.

    I brought 2 batches of cinnamon buns to work and they were gone in an instant! Thanks for sharing the recipe; it’s definitely a keeper. (Actually some people asked if I would make them again the next day, haha)😀

    Jacqueline

    Reply
  • 11. Jennie  |  February 12, 2008 at 9:44 pm

    Jacqueline – Awesome!🙂 I’m not sure what to say about the dough being super springy. It is a pretty elastic dough in general but it can usually be beaten into submission. Perhaps you had an extra ambitious batch of yeast. Thicker rolls aren’t a bad thing though – just lather on the butter, cinnamon and sugar to make sure there’s plenty of gooey delight to go around all that dough. So glad you tried them and thanks for letting me know how they turned out! 🙂

    Reply
  • 12. Miss Scarlett  |  February 19, 2008 at 12:23 pm

    I was searcihng Tastespotting for Cinnamon recipes when I discovered your incredible cinnamon rolls. Or – SIN-namon as the case may be. The cinnamon raisin bread looks incredible. Love that you took step-by-step pics, too. Very handy for novice bread makers out there.

    Reply
  • 13. Jennie  |  February 19, 2008 at 1:34 pm

    Glad you like it, Miss Scarlett! We’re in the middle of another week of bread here on SFTF so stay-tuned for more tutorials! 🙂

    Reply
  • 14. Lauren  |  October 1, 2008 at 5:06 pm

    I found this page by searching in pictures for cinnamon raisin loaf recipe…yours was the best looking! I can’t wait to try it!

    Reply

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