Stuffed Turnips

February 29, 2008 at 12:30 pm 6 comments

Turnip tucked in tulips
a turnip tucked in tulips

Port Wine and Pastries:  Yes, my dear readers, I am currently away from my desk/computer, hiking around the steep hills of Lisbon and rural sections of the northern Minho region of pint-sized Portugal.  I can’t wait to get back and tell you all about the rich old-world culture of this unique little country oft forgotten by European travelers intent on getting to Italy and Spain.  In the meantime, enjoy this post for Turnips Stuffed with Rutabaga and Peas, and please have patience with my delay in responding to comments. 

Obrigada e adeus (thank you and farewell)! 

A lone rutabaga
a lone rutabaga
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Turnip flesh and shell
a turnip shell and its insides
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Top of stuffed turnip
top of a stuffed turnip
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Veggies for rosting
rutabaga and turnip pieces for roasting
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Roasted vegetable
roasting done
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Mmmm...peas and butter
peas and butter!
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The finished dish
turnip stuffed with rutabaga and peas
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X marks the spot
“x” marks the spot for scooping out turnip flesh 
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Turnip stuff with rutabaga and peas
stuffed turnip with tulips
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Turnips Stuffed with Rutabaga and Peas
Loosely adapted from Lancaster Farming, 1/12/08

2 large turnips
½ a small rutabaga
½ c. frozen peas
1 T. extra virgin olive oil
1 t. cumin
1 t. ground rosemary
1 t. rubbed sage
1 t. salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Scrub turnips well and cut a thin slice off the top and the bottom of each.  Working carefully with a sharp knife, cut an “x” through the turnip flesh, being sure not to pierce the sides.  Using a melon baller or small spoon, carve out the insides of the turnip, leaving a ¼ – ½ inch thick wall all around.  Set turnip shells aside and save the “insides” for the next step.

Preheat the oven to 400 F.  Peel the rutabaga and dice in to small cubes.  On a foil lined baking sheet, toss rutabaga cubes and turnip insides (cut up any turnip that seems too big) with olive oil.  Sprinkle spices, salt, and pepper over them and toss again to coat evenly.  Roast in the oven until tender and browned on the edges, about 20 minutes. 

While vegetables roast, bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Salt generously and submerge the turnip shells in the water.  Boil for about 10 minute until fork-tender.  Remove from water with a slotted spoon or tongs, dumping out any water in the cavities.  Let turnip shells drain and cool.  Cook the frozen peas for three minutes in the same boiling water as you used for the turnips.  Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 

When all the vegetables are ready, combine the peas and roasted vegetables before stuffing them into the turnip shells.  Serve immediately or keep warm a 200 F oven until ready.  Any leftover vegetable stuffing can be served alongside the stuffed turnips.

(serves 2)

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Insides of a stuffed turnip
insides of a stuffed turnip
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Entry filed under: Purely Vegetables, Recipes. Tags: , , , , .

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6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. chuck  |  March 13, 2008 at 1:17 pm

    I love the turnip bowl what a great way to serve vegetables. Just beautiful!

    Reply
  • 2. Jennie  |  March 13, 2008 at 2:51 pm

    Thanks, Chuck! 🙂

    Reply
  • 3. Carolyn  |  December 17, 2008 at 5:35 pm

    just happened upon your website when I googled, “stuffed turnips”. I only eat local foods and each winter it’s a challenge to get my boys to eat turnips so I have to get pretty creative…
    loved your idea! Didn’t follow it to a tee but they were beautiful and my 10-year old gave them a “10” on a 1-10 scale (well–the filling, anyway–which consisted of sauteed mushrooms and onions, and roasted carrots and turnips). Thanks for the pretty page and the great idea!

    Reply
  • 4. Louise  |  October 3, 2009 at 4:45 pm

    Oh Jennie!!! What an elegant dish. I sure think you should revisit this post and share it again. It’s stunningly scrumptious.

    P.S I won’t even tell you how I found it:)

    Reply
    • 5. Jennie  |  October 3, 2009 at 7:18 pm

      Ah, Louise, you’re too cute. You’re right, this was a very tasty and beautiful dish. I’m sure I could do it better justice photo-wise today and it’s perfect for upcoming colder days. Consider it back on my “to make” list. 🙂

      Reply
      • 6. Louise  |  October 4, 2009 at 6:56 am

        Yipeee! I think this post looks just perfect the way it is!!!

        Reply

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