Keeping Local Alive

November 2, 2009 at 6:19 pm 6 comments

Used books

Sorry, no food in today’s post.  Instead, I have a somewhat urgent plea directed towards those of you that are here with me in Philadelphia and a general “post-it note” for those of you with a “local” mind-set everywhere.  I just found out that my favorite of all bookstores is on the brink of closing its doors.  Walk a Crooked Mile is a local shop I’ve featured on the blog before.   It’s a community institution in Mt. Airy, my neighborhood, and has been a source of countless hours of pleasurable lazy afternoon book browsing for myself and many others.   Hearing how the economy has taken its toll on Walk a Crooked Mile reminds me how precious and fragile our local businesses – those that have such “personality” and really contribute to the fabric of our communities – are and how quickly something that’s “been around forever” can suddenly be “closed for good.”  

More used books

With the holidays fast approaching again, I’d encourage you to start making your shopping lists in a very different manner.  Rather than think about what everyone on your list wants in a generic sense, why not make a list of shops in your community that you’d really like to support and then put the names of people you’re buying for next to the shops where you’ll probably find something they like.  Then go out and support local businesses by finding unique gifts for everyone on your list in those local stores.  I know it can be a little more expensive sometimes, but think about how boring life would be if our only merchants were cheap big box stores and fast food chains.    Gift certificates to local businesses are another great way to get your friends and family to go check out the local scene and appreciate all it has to offer.  Several stores, including Walk a Crooked Mile, sell their wares online so you’re not limited to giving gift certificates to those folks that live in the same ‘hood as you. 

Shop sign

I am going to be doing some early holiday shopping and stock up on some of the excellent gardening and food reference books that Walk a Crooked Mile always has on hand.   If you’re in Philly, why not make an afternoon of it – take the R7 to the Mt. Airy stop and have a free cup of tea or coffee and pet C.C. the resident cat while you take in the nostalgic aroma of old books and soak up the puddles of sunshine that always seem to be streaming through the windows at Walk a Crooked Mile.   If you’re not in Philadelphia, but have a heart of gold, you can still help keep this beautiful book store in business by making a donation online

Tea and a cat

Entry filed under: Extra Credit. Tags: .

Canning Pears Rustic Pear Tart

6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. ames  |  November 2, 2009 at 9:17 pm

    I gave today to Walk a Crooked Mile. I didn’t have time to shop for books today but I will. I want that store to always be there. Help him out please!

    Reply
    • 2. Jennie  |  November 2, 2009 at 10:02 pm

      Thanks, Ames! That’s awesome!

      Reply
  • 3. alana  |  November 3, 2009 at 10:16 am

    thanks for this. amazon can be so seductive, but we all need to remember that our local bookstores are worth their weight in gold, and without them, it is a sad community of online shoppers…

    Reply
  • 4. Food-Fitness-FreshAir  |  November 3, 2009 at 6:49 pm

    Yes, at least this can be reached by the R, considering SEPTA’s on strike!

    Reply
  • 5. Philly Dame » Help Save Walk A Crooked Mile, Mt. Airy  |  November 22, 2009 at 11:38 am

    […] A Crooked Mile, the charming bookstore located in the Mt. Airy train station line, is in danger of closing it’s doors forever. If you haven’t been, check out this photo tour from the Straight From the Farm blog and then […]

    Reply
  • 6. Jason  |  December 17, 2009 at 10:01 am

    I hope that the store can be saved. Local businesses mean so much to the heart and soul of any community. I hope more people can come around to this idea and stop shopping at the big box stores that are completely homogenizing our cities and small towns. We try our best to shop locally and eat locally.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Add to Google Add to My Yahoo!

All text and photos © 2007-2012 Straight From the Farm. Contact straightfromthefarm (at)gmail(dot)com to ask for permission before reprinting in any format.

Archives

Fill in your email address below to get new posts sent to your inbox so you'll never miss a great recipe!

Join 459 other followers

Favorite Photos

LNF Tags1923

LNF Tags1922 copy

LNF Tags1921

LNF Tags1919

LNF Tags1918

LNF Tags1917

LNF Tags1916

LNF Tags1915

LNF Tags1914

LNF Tags1913

More Photos

My site was nominated for Best Food Blog!

CookEatShare Featured Author
view my recipes
CookEatShare Featured Author

The Foodie Blog Roll


%d bloggers like this: